Epiphanies like these are so much more likely to occur for me in grocery stores and laundromats, rather than in the more traditional places of reverence and prayer. They are moments in which the baseline about what is good and important in my life changes. Often they come just when it feels like life has played another rotten trick on me and nothing in my life is ever going to go as I expect. Through these hardships comes the realization that it is in the most ordinary aspects of my life—the ones in which everything can, and does, go wrong—that I am offered glimpses of the extraordinary. In these flashes of insight, I understand for a moment that one of the great dividends of darkness is an increased sensitivity to light. And in these rare and expansive moments, I am called to delight. –Martha Manning, Undercurrents: A Life Beneath the Surface

Epiphanies like these are so much more likely to occur for me in grocery stores and laundromats, rather than in the more traditional places of reverence and prayer. They are moments in which the baseline about what is good and important in my life changes. Often they come just when it feels like life has played another rotten trick on me and nothing in my life is ever going to go as I expect. Through these hardships comes the realization that it is in the most ordinary aspects of my life—the ones in which everything can, and does, go wrong—that I am offered glimpses of the extraordinary. In these flashes of insight, I understand for a moment that one of the great dividends of darkness is an increased sensitivity to light. And in these rare and expansive moments, I am called to delight. –Martha Manning, Undercurrents: A Life Beneath the Surface