It’s been awhile since I checked out the work of UK-born artist Byroglyphics but that doesn’t mean he hasn’t been pumping out some fantastic work. In fact, his newest print release called Flat Earth, is so stunning I had to scoop one up myself.
For those of you who haven’t heard of this artist, he says that his work is somewhere between “urban fine art and contemporary graphics, a collision of real and digital media.” Though he often infuses animal imagery into his pieces, sometimes, like in this print, it’s all about the beautiful mess.
Here’s how he describes his creative process: “For my graphic work I compile as much source material as possible in the form of textures, random marks and scribbles etc and scan it all, the primary image is drawn and also scanned. I then manipulate the constituent parts on the computer, I keep the amount of layers to a bare minimum so the results are as spontaneous as possible. I don’t use any filters at all to keep the ‘digital’ nature of the image to a minimum.”

It’s been awhile since I checked out the work of UK-born artist Byroglyphics but that doesn’t mean he hasn’t been pumping out some fantastic work. In fact, his newest print release called Flat Earth, is so stunning I had to scoop one up myself.

For those of you who haven’t heard of this artist, he says that his work is somewhere between “urban fine art and contemporary graphics, a collision of real and digital media.” Though he often infuses animal imagery into his pieces, sometimes, like in this print, it’s all about the beautiful mess.

Here’s how he describes his creative process: “For my graphic work I compile as much source material as possible in the form of textures, random marks and scribbles etc and scan it all, the primary image is drawn and also scanned. I then manipulate the constituent parts on the computer, I keep the amount of layers to a bare minimum so the results are as spontaneous as possible. I don’t use any filters at all to keep the ‘digital’ nature of the image to a minimum.”